On Birds and Monotony: Sailing Over The Atlantic Ocean

In the 2nd day of our Atlantic crossing, a bird travelled in through the porthole close to our sleep within the owner’s cabin.

I happened to be on night watch with Kristi whenever Ryan appeared in the saloon having a look of dazed confusion on his face.

“There’s a bird in my own bed room,” he mumbled.

I looked over Kristi and laughed, presuming Ryan had either simply woken up from the vivid dream and hadn’t shaken off the rest yet or he had been sleep-walking round the motorboat talking nonsense. Regardless, it was funny, which is the reason why i possibly couldn’t stop laughing as I asked Ryan to clarify. “Exactly What?”

“There’s a bird within my room.”

Kristi and I also viewed one another in disbelief even as we made our method downstairs to your owner’s cabin to see what Ryan had been speaking about.

As expected, perched on to the floor next to my bed, was a little monochrome bird looking around and hopping lightly across the flooring, never fazed by the two big people bent over it, staring and giggling.

“Oh my Jesus, there really IS a bird in room!” I said.

“we told you,” said Ryan, rubbing his eyes and yawning. “It flew past my head while I happened to be sleeping and woke me personally up.”

“Aw, he’s so sweet!” We said, gradually inching towards the bird. “What are you doing in right here, small man?” I cupped my arms lightly across the little bird’s body, anticipating it to struggle and fight to travel from my grasp. But rather the bird sat calmly as I scooped it and stepped upstairs towards saloon.

The pumpkin seeds were of no interest to this bird (Photo by Kristi Wilson)

I set the bird down on our dining table exterior, again expecting it to fly frantically across the cockpit, attempting to escape, however it didn’t. The bird seemed tired, like perhaps he got lost and had stopped to obtain some remainder before continuing on towards its in the offing destination. I set a plate of water and some sunflower seeds on the table, which the bird showed simply no desire for. But used to don’t wish to be a poor host; I’d to about attempt to offer our little visitor some refreshments.

The remainder of my night view passed without incident and although the sunrise had been because pretty as any sunrise I’ve seen at ocean, the sky streaked with shades of red and purple, we don’t keep in mind anything else concerning the time.

The sunsets will always stunning regarding the Atlantic Ocean, this indicates (Photo by Kristi Wilson)

Which is pretty much like each and every day that passed on our Atlantic crossing. Days consisted of long stretches to do absolutely nothing in a variety of jobs on the boat — at the helm, in cockpit, on the beanbag seat regarding the foredeck, in the saloon, on the sun lounger beside the helm — name the area and you could often find a half asleep crew member curled up there wanting to pass the time reading a book, viewing a film, playing cards or simply staring away at the waves.

The facts associated with extended hours spent doing absolutely nothing have actually slipped from my head like water through my fingers. Nevertheless the animals we encountered became the hard, vivid memories that endured out once I thought right back on each for the 20 days that passed even as we bobbed around on Atlantic Ocean. The bird that flew into my bedroom, most of the seafood we caught, the dolphins that played in our wake, your family of whales that circled our boat, the squid we within our dinghy as well as the flying fish that tossed themselves at ship during night watches; those will be the things I remember vividly concerning the crossing. My memories are marked by way of a sequence of animals on an ocean timeline.

Morgan proudly revealing their big catch

On every ocean crossing I’ve ever done (which can be 3 now — twice over the Atlantic Ocean and when across the Southern Ocean), memories from very first day or two seem to be lost on walking dead which can be the crew up to speed. As everybody adjusts with their strange sleep schedules, as well as the seasickness that always hits a sorry some of the team, there exists a large amount of stumbling around silently and brewing strong coffees to shake off the malaise with blanketed the complete motorboat.

For the very first day or two, the concern for team is always to keep carefully the boat cruising, try to eat regular dishes and remain awake the few hours we’re working during the day. Whenever we’re maybe not on view, we could all be located strewn around the motorboat in a variety of states of sleep or almost-sleep, either clutching a guide while curled on the foredeck in the beanbag chair, stretched out regarding couch half asleep hugging a laptop (that’s my usual place) or lying during intercourse wanting to view a movie.

If all this appears boring and instead uneventful, that’s because it is. And that’s precisely why I happened to ben’t at all concerned about the notion of crossing the vast Atlantic Ocean on our own boat — most likely, I’d already done it regarding the Clipper Race, and now we didn’t have the blissful luxury then of turning on our engines if the wind passed away. On the Clipper Race, we sat flailing around in the Doldrums with this sails hanging limply for 10 times, baking in sun and losing sight of our minds with boredom.

There’s absolutely nothing more boring than having no wind on an ocean race

Then when Ryan and I also got the option of having our brand new watercraft, Cheeky Monkey, delivered to the U.S. from France for the hefty cost of $15,000, I scarcely paused before stating we might get our ship in France and sail it throughout the Atlantic ourselves.

Which is sort of crazy, since I think about this, because I’m able to vividly keep in mind the thrilling terror we felt in December 2012 when we lay out on Hideaway to sail from Fort Lauderdale to Bimini, Bahamas. I happened to be imagining everything that may get wrong as we destroyed sight of land and had been out of selection of other boaters, considering we hardly knew what we were doing as sailors and had never done a landfall like that before. And that had been just a thirty-five hour sail I’d gotten myself all upset over.

Obviously, things did make a mistake, as they constantly do. Our motor began over-heating and spitting sea water out onto our cabin floor, which turned into the result of a corroded heat exchanger. But once we reached Bimini with our defective motor, we’d extended ourselves, mentally and physically, beyond the range of that which we thought we’re able to do. Therefore made us wonder just what would take place if we continued to go further.

Looking back on our learning times on Hideaway, I am awed by this newfound fearless dedication i need to cross oceans, that we understand was not something we also remotely desired to do before meeting Ryan, also it definitely was not a concept I felt anyway comfortable with also 5 years into cruising Hideaway round the harbors of New York.

And so I realize when I meet sailors and cruisers from the water whom never make an effort to sail beyond the Caribbean, or maybe even their home ports. They name the discomforts of being at sea for extended intervals and exactly how they prefer to avoid all that. Sailing is one thing they encounter for fun — the increased threat of being not even close to land and help is a thing that overshadows any idea of fun in sailing from neighborhood shores. We absolutely understand all of those sentiments.

But in some way, i’ve found myself through the years stretching just a little further than i did so prior to and working out the muscle that hopes and dreams of places even further away until I’ve found myself feeling more comfortable being away from sight of land and growing more confident in my ship and my own sailing skills.

5 years back, in the event that you asked me to achieve this, I’d be saying “HELL NO.” (Photo by Kristi Wilson)

To look right back on where we started is often amusing because I have simply described a 20-day Atlantic crossing as being, basically, boring, but for the sequence of animals that sent me shrieking and operating sporadically throughout the foredeck to enjoy a closer glance at what was splashing on top. The moments that filled the areas between those animals I can’t remember without yawning, while they had been pleasantly dull moments high in silence, lapping waves, some meals and many publications.

The bird that flew in through our window on the second day’s our Atlantic crossing hopped around our saloon and cockpit for your night, seemingly comfortable into the presence of humans, every now and then sitting nevertheless and dozing down. It made no make an effort to fly off to the darkness and we proceeded sailing on course with your little bird visitor up to speed, wondering just how long it could remain. It absolutely was like the bird had flown beyond its capacity and got lost in the dark, but had the nice fortune of locating a friendly boat in which he could sit down and rest for the bit while finding out what direction to go next.

I hope Cheeky Monkey could be hospitable to all lost birds on ocean

At the crack of dawn, since the sun crept up throughout the horizon, the bird perked up and seemed beyond the cockpit towards the sky. And without warning, the bird flapped its wings and flew off toward some not known location which perhaps, after some rest, seemed feasible to achieve after all.

Like this little bird, we had sailed out into the as yet not known often times and encountered conditions that meant we’d to get rid of and regroup before continuing onwards. However with every barrier we overcame, we found a boost in confidence as well as an upsurge in interest, wondering how far we could get the next time.

Which is why crossing the Atlantic Ocean on Cheeky Monkey is not the actual only real milestone i’m I’ve reached in my cruising experience. It’s that We find myself describing an ocean crossing as “mostly boring” apart from the animals that punctuate the times, illustrating how far and wide my comfort zone has stretched considering that the early days of sailing Hideaway.

It’s taken a long time of plenty of little leaps, along with a fair bit of sleep and regrouping between journeys, however it finally feels like our wings are at our strongest and there is no place we can’t fly to. Which begs issue, in which shall we get next?

It might be boring at times to cross oceans, but it sure is gorgeous

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Revision from Tasha

Hey everyone! When you haven’t yet watched all 4 of our videos about crossing the Atlantic Ocean on our YouTube Channel, check them down! It had been an epic adventure.

Video links

There’s this 1 — Atlantic Crossing: ARE WE SET?

And then there’s this 1 — cruising the Atlantic: SHE WENT OVERBOARD!

And there’s the one in which we had been becalmed for 4 times — Atlantic Crossing: STUCK IN A WIND GAP

And, finally, that one, in which we’re ecstatic to have finally reached land — Atlantic Crossing: WE CAUSED IT TO BE!

I’ve been thinking plenty about our Atlantic crossing because we have been soon embarking on our journey over the Pacific Ocean and I’m hoping we’ll discovered from our mistakes on Atlantic and also have a level better adventure regarding the Pacific! We’ll see!

Interact with me!

If you don’t currently follow me personally on social media marketing, here are some ways you can maintain me even as we continue our activities across oceans:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/turf2surf – daily photos and stories of our current adventures

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/turftosurf – I tweet from sea via my SatPhone connection! Then when we’re from land, follow me personally here.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com – Awesome pictures of our travels by ship

Track us regarding ocean!

You’ll track us for a map while we’re sailing! Our Iridium Go! connects for this tracker and updates once or twice daily so you’ll constantly know where we are and how from celebrating our arrival we have been.

Follow us right here: www.gtctrack.com/anonymous/turftosurf

That’s it! I’ll be getting more tales to you soon, in the meantime take pleasure in the videos we’re placing out!

Love,

Tasha